Sparking The Healing Miracle: Energy Medicine Yoga

Sparking The Healing Miracle: Energy Medicine Yoga

Energy speaks to everything: physical, mental, spiritual and emotional issues. I noticed that physical aches were resolving faster than before, and on a daily basis, I was more joyful, calm, centered and grounded—all things you can get from traditional yoga practice, in theory, yet I hadn’t found that to be lasting for me personally.

A Q&A with Energy Medicine Yoga founder Lauren Walker.

Conscious Impact: Living Yoga in Nepal

Conscious Impact: Living Yoga in Nepal

A few months ago, I was telling a friend about the revelations I had during my yoga teacher training. Moving through trauma in my body, breaking habitual patterns of the mind, realizing the complexity of dis-ease and reclaiming my voice–to name a few. I found myself, in the end, describing the experience as “life-changing,” coating the phrase in disclaimers before I uttered it.

“I know this sounds cliché,” I said as I held my breath, hoping he didn’t think I was melodramatic or trying to be trendy. The word “life-changing” has become so diluted.

His response startled me. “That’s amazing! Yes, despite what we’re taught to believe, we can, in fact, have transformative experiences on a regular basis.” He might as well have said, “DUH! Welcome to the world.”

Solo Trekking in the Himalayas

Solo Trekking in the Himalayas

I have a tendency to make travel plans on my own, not because I don’t want the company of others—I do! But in my experience, it’s difficult to find friends who can take time off work, who have similar traveling styles and budgets, and who won’t drive me insane (and vice versa) after weeks of crowded vans, small sleeping quarters and situations that don’t lend themselves to ample personal space.

When I was planning my trek in Nepal, however, the need for company seemed more like a mandatory safety precaution than a nicety.

Finding Beauty in Monsoon Season

Finding Beauty in Monsoon Season

“Should we go back?” I asked myself, as the pelting rain and thunderous rivers created an unrelenting cacophony in my mind. I stopped to flick two thumb-sized leeches off the rubber grips of my trekking poles in an attempt to avoid another feeding frenzy—a horrific sight I hadn’t gotten over since the night before, when I discovered these invertebrates can weave through fabrics otherwise thought to be impenetrable.

It was day five of a 14-day trek in the Annapurna Region of the Himalayas, and I was beginning to question our aspirations.

Rewriting the Story: One Word, One Pose at a Time

Rewriting the Story: One Word, One Pose at a Time

I am here, again, with an enervating ache in my chest. Sipping air, careful not to choke on the Asian Pacific humidity, as fears of another health issue leave me scanning for the mercy of kind, accepting eyes. Instead, I find judgment in my own pupils. They burn holes through the mirror as I ask—audibly, yet rhetorically—“I thought we were past all this?” Over the part where I doubted my body’s intelligence and its inherent need for rest. Over the part where I let my fears run the show and juggle worst-case scenarios in my head like circus balls.

It was week two of my yoga teacher training in Chiang Mai, Thailand—and I was unraveling.

Namaste in Montana

Namaste in Montana

Known for its expansive prairies, snow-capped peaks and abundant wildlife, Montana has been a retreat destination for decades. Yet, in the grand scheme of the international yoga community, it’s still a hidden gem—just the way we like it.

From Emigrant to Helena to Wolf Creek, part of the allure of a yoga retreat in Montana is the juxtaposition of cowboys and goddesses, frosty mornings and heated Vinyasa, elk steak tacos and lentil soup. But if you look deeper, these differences make the Treasure State truly unique, a blending of cultures and landscapes that allows you to release expectations and be yourself.

These three retreat destinations, distinct in their offerings, provide guests the opportunity to hold everything as sacred and reconnect with nature as the greatest teacher.

Tick Medicine, Thanking Your Suffering + Lyme Disease as the Greatest Teacher

Tick Medicine, Thanking Your Suffering + Lyme Disease as the Greatest Teacher

In the fall of 2014, I quit my job and bought a one-way ticket to Asia with the goal of feeling alive in my 25-year-old body. I had been working in corporate promotional sales for a few years, long hours in front of a computer to pay the bills, get up and do it again the next day. My joints were stiff, my eating and drinking habits never graduated from college, my brain was foggy and I had no energy. I thought if I could just get on the open road and see the beauty of the world, I’d come back to life.

The Original ‘Om on the Range’

The Original ‘Om on the Range’

Deep between the lodgepole pines and aspen trees of Helena, MT, people wake to sunlight beaming through the clear dome of a custom-built yurt. They walk gravel paths to morning meditation, eat breakfast in silence, practice asana twice a day, drink tea and share stories by the campfire, and close out the night with a sauna, hot tub or massage session.

This is a typical retreat schedule at the Feathered Pipe Ranch. As a healing center, the ranch is known for its dewy lake view, mouthwatering cuisine, world-renowned teachers, and quiet time filled with the sights and sounds of nature. Deer share the path to the bathhouse, chipmunks chase each other quicker than your eyes can follow, and if you’re lucky, you’ll spot the resident eagles and osprey soaring across a cloudless blue sky.